"Angela Ingersoll (as commanding in the classics as she is in musicals)

is radiant as Lady Anne, the young widow so hideously seduced by Richard."

-Chicago Sun-Times

RICHARD III

Chicago Shakespeare Theater  /  Chicago, IL

“Angela Ingersoll as Lady Anne Neville brings a delicate intensity to a notoriously difficult role. One can feel her chaotic emotions as she is wooed literally over the dead body of her father-in-law... Ms. Ingersoll makes Anne’s impossible choices seem understandable – not an easy task."
-Chicago Theatre Blog

“Angela Ingersoll (as commanding in the classics as she is in musicals) is radiant as Lady Anne, the young widow so hideously seduced by Richard.”
-Chicago Sun Times

“In the small yet powerful role of Lady Anne Angela Ingersoll is terrific. Ingersoll’s passionate anger and catatonic self-loathing make me wish Shakespeare had expanded the role much further.”
-PlayShakespeare.com

“If anyone stole the show it's Angela Ingersoll's quiet but perpetually enraged Lady Anne. I've never witnessed such intensity on stage.”
-The Highly Suggestible Type

“Gaines delivers her best scenes with the aid from excellent supporting performances, especially Angela Ingersoll as Lady Anne, a pretty young Princess with a kicky modern hairstyle, wearing a tight bustier top and richly layered blue and purple skirts... After Acton's wooing Richard forces a kiss, she spits in his face, but is finally overwhelmed by his veiled threats, and when she surrenders with a tremble, she touches his cheek and bids him farewell more in momentary self-preservation than in defeat.”
-Shaltz Shakespeare Reviews

“We know Acton is the man for the role after the success of the famous early scene with Lady Anne... Angela Ingersoll is a fine foil for Acton in the wooing scene.”
-Copley News Service

“And the cast, weighted toward longtime Chicago pros, is strong—particularly Jennifer Harmon, Wendy Robie, Angela Ingersoll, and Mary Ann Thebus as the royal mothers and wives who have to bear the toad in ways the men can't possibly comprehend.”
-Chicago Reader

“The production's greatest strength lies in its treatment of a set of characters often underemphasized in performance: the wives and mothers of England's rapidly changing cast of kings... A pair of scenes in which Jennifer Harmon, Wendy Robie, Mary Ann Thebus, and Angela Ingersoll converge onstage are both quiet and wrenching.”
-Centerstage

Production Photos: Chicago Shakespeare Theater